Raynors HCA 2019-05
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Absentee bidding for this session ends on Thursday, May 30, 2019 at 11:00 AM EDT.
The live portion of this session begins on Thursday, May 30, 2019 at 11:00 AM EDT
A great antebellum Virginia gentleman's contract averting a duel between two of some of Richmond's most respected elders. Apparently, a war of words eluted between the Editor of the Richmond Daily Whig and William Daniel, Jr., judge on the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. Disaster was averted after a body of four attorneys, which included James A. Seddon, secretary of war for the Confederacy, independently read the upsetting articles and concluded that no harm was intended by either party. The contract, 1p. 4to., Richmond, [Va.], Oct. 20, 1849, reads, in part: "The undersigned having read the correspondence between Mess. Moseley and Daniel…the whole ground of complaint against Judge Daniel is his supposed endorsement of an offensive article in the Lynchburg Republican, by a publication of Judge Daniel's in the Examiner…which we have also read, are of the opinion, that the statement of Judge Daniel in the Examiner judging from the terms of the reference to the article in the Republican…was never intended to apply to Mr. Moseley…but simply to deny…the authorship of an article previously published in the Lynchburg Republican…we would respectfully suggest that as this controversy never should have arisen between Mr. Moseley and Judge Daniel, the previous correspondence be withdrawn and the difficulty be considered as honorably adjusted. James Lyons, Robert C. Stanard, Henry P. Irving, James A. Seddon. We, William Daniel and Aex. Moseley assent to and adopt the foregoing paper, Wm. Daniel, Jr, A. Moseley." Alexander Moseley (1807-1881) graduate University of Virginia; editor of the Richmond Daily Whig 1842-1861and president of the UVA's Society of Alumni on their establishment in 1838. William Daniel, Jr. (1806-1873) earned law degree from University of Virginia; member Virginia House of Delegates; judge Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals; proponent of slavery evidence by his decision denying a manumission clause in a will based on the opinion that slaves were incapable of making such decisions; also for upholding Va. law giving state inspectors the right to inspect out of state owned vessels, bound for the north, for Fugitive Slaves. Overall near fine.
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A Duel Is Averted Between Leading Members of Virginia Society

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